17.9 C
Cairo, EG
Friday, December 6, 2019
The Transient Universe
Workshop : Patents Right
Meteorites Workshop
Sun Orthogonality Phenomenon

Misallat geomagnetic observatory is currently the primary magnetic observatory of the Institute. The observatory is located 70 km to the south west of Cairo in the Faiyum governorate at 29.51°N & 30.88°E.

Misallat geomagnetic observatory was established in 1960 as a substitute for the geomagnetic observations in Helwan Observatory. The moves of the geomagnetic observations from Helwan to Misallat were necessary as electrification of the railways progressed, making accurate geomagnetic measurements was impossible in Helwan. Initially, the regular observations were based on instrument that continuously registered the changing geomagnetic field photographically (e.g. La Cour magnetometer). Meanwhile, other eye based observation instrument were regularly used for absolute magnetic measurements (e.g. QHM). Later on, digital automatic observations were made using the Automatic Observatory. Currently, the observatory running the latest modern magnetometers. The observatory uses Magson magnetometer for X, Y, Z variations measurements every one second. In addition, the dIdD overhauser magnetometer is used for monitoring the variation in the geomagnetic field direction. Moreover, regular absolute measurements are made using the DI flux and overhauser magnetometer. The observatory IAGA code is MLT. Magnetic variations recorded at the observatory are sent to head quarter in Helwan in near real time.

http://www.wdc.bgs.ac.uk/obsinfo/mlt.html

http://isgi.unistra.fr/observatory.php?obs=MLT

Currently Operating Magnetometers

Magnetometer Manufacture Measurements
Tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer Magson GmbH, Germany Variation Recording at 1 Hz sampling rate
Overhauser GSM 19  GEM systems, Canada Total magnetic field
Mag-01H D/I System Bartington Instruments Ltd, England Magnetic field declination and inclination
dIdD overhauser vector magnetometer GEM systems, Canada Monitoring changes in the  Declination and Inclination.

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